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Junie B. Jones Stupid Smelly Bus Tour Coming to Nashville

  • Posted on June 11, 2013 at 6:11 AM

JBJ Bus copyright Marcia CirielloTHE JUNIE B. JONES® STUPID SMELLY BUS TOUR

IS COMING TO NASHVILLE!

DON’T MISS IT! I Can’t WAIT!!!! 

 Celebrate the TENTH ANNIVERSARY of the tour,

which brings literary favorite Junie B. Jones to 15 cities across the country!

Come Along for the Ride!

WHAT:                                  Live performance and “Bookstamping”

The Junie B. Jones® Stupid Smelly Bus is bringing the star of the bestselling Junie B. Jones® book series to meet her fans JBJ_BusTour_Logo_2013_round (2)in 15 cities across the country.  Book retailers will host events at which Junie B. will share her hilarious antics through a live, theatrical performance based on Barbara Park’s bestselling Junie B. Jones®series.  Events also include free Junie B. souvenirs for kids and an official “book stamping.”  This event is recommended for children ages 5 and up.

Launched in the summer of 2004, Junie B. Jones and Mr. Woo have spent almost every summer traveling the country in their hot pink bus bringing everyone’s favorite first grader Junie B. Jones to life. With an original script written by award-winning author Barbara Park, Junie B. Jones and her bus driver, Mr. Woo will be entertaining new readers and established fans alike.  The Junie B. Jones® series is one of the most popular among kids, and has sold over 55 million print, audio books, and eBooks to date.

JBJ Symbols copyright Marcia CirielloWHO:                                    Featuring Nicole Acevedo, as Junie B. Jones, Karlo Ceria, as Mr. Woo and produced by G. Wayne Hoffman, this event brings the bestselling Junie B. Jones® series to life!

WHEN/WHERE:          Sunday, June 23rd at 2:00 PM

Nashville Children’s Theater (Co-sponsored by Parnassus Books)

25 Middleton Street, Nashville, TN 37210

For more information, call the store at (615) 953-2243

Monday, June 24th at 11:00 AM    Barnes & Noble 1701 Mallory Lane, Brentwood TN, 37207

Learn more at JunieBJones.com.           

Admission information:  The Junie B. Jones® Stupid Smelly Bus Tour events are free and open to the general public unless otherwise noted.

The Junie B. Jones® Stupid Smelly Bus Tour is sponsored by Random House Children’s Books

Nonfiction Monday is here in PracticallyParadise

  • Posted on June 9, 2013 at 11:34 PM

nonfiction.mondayIt’s back! Practically Paradise is happy to host Nonfiction Monday June 10, 2013, after a long break from blogging. I had a backlog of books to read and will be sharing those titles with you frequently from now through the summer. Today we have links to posts written by bloggers around the kidlitosphere. If you’d like to add a post, you can submit information on the google docs form or simply post it in the comments below.

Here’s a title that I am excitedly planning for purchasing in the fall with a publication date of  Nov. 1st:Hey charleston!

Hey, Charleston! The True Story of the Jenkins Orphanage Band by Anne Rockwell (Author) and Colin Bootman (Illustrator). Lerner books, 2013. $16.95 Hardcover, Jacketed. $12.95 eBook. Ages 7–11 HC: 978-0-7613-5565-6 EB: 978-0-7613-8843-2. 32 Pages

I couldn’t wait for this title so reviewed it from NetGalley after reading this description:

What happened when a former slave took beat-up old instruments and gave them to a bunch of orphans? Thousands of futures got a little brighter and a great American art form was born.

In 1891, Reverend Daniel Joseph Jenkins opened his orphanage in Charleston, South Carolina. He soon had hundreds of children and needed a way to support them. Jenkins asked townspeople to donate old band instruments—some of which had last played in the hands of Confederate soldiers in the Civil War. He found teachers to show the kids how to play. Soon the orphanage had a band. And what a band it was.

The Jenkins Orphanage Band caused a sensation on the streets of Charleston. People called the band’s style of music “rag”—a rhythm inspired by the African-American people who lived on the South Carolina and Georgia coast. The children performed as far away as Paris and London, and they earned enough money to support the orphanage that still exists today. They also helped launch the music we now know as jazz.

Hey, Charleston! is the story of the kind man who gave America “some rag” and so much more. If you visit the Lernerbooks.com website, you can download and fold a two-sided bookmark to accompany this book.

Since I live in Nashville, Tennessee, which is the home of the Fisk Jubilee Singers, stories about the effect music has on children’s lives means a great deal to me. This historical description of the beginning of jazz is interesting musically, but the perseverance of Reverend Daniel Joseph Jenkins is what cries out the most. The illustrations are filled with energy and movement. The dancers inspire movement. Be prepared to play some rag and dance the Charleston to fully engage with your story time listeners. This is a great pick and I cannot wait to share the print version with my students.

Howie’s first post for his summer reading

  • Posted on June 9, 2013 at 9:14 PM

TheLabHowie shares with us his post about The Lab by by Jack Heath giving it 4 out of 5 stars.

The Lab is a book about a super human spy that was born in a tube.  The main character of this story is Agent Six of Hearts. Six has the biggest secret on the planet, he is a test subject in an experiment to create the ultimate assassins. He has to stop the lab from creating an army while also keeping  his giant secret.  Along the way he finds help in a physical copy of himself.  Some of Six’s enhancements are bat hearing, hawk sight and bones, sharks skin, and cheetah speed.

http://jackheath.com.au/books/the-lab/

 

 

What are you wearing to the Newbery/Caldecott banquet?

  • Posted on June 9, 2013 at 4:49 PM

Have you seen the video by Jim Averbeck and Betsy Bird for the 75th Caldecott Anniversary: Byrd & Averbeck Plan

The anniversary committee is encouraging folks to wear elegant attire that gives a nod to the wearer’s favorite Caldecott winner or honoree, past or present. There will be a station set up for photographs, encouragement to share them on social media, and a red carpet.

I’m waiting for my summer workshop paycheck to purchase my ticket to the banquet, but already I’m considering what to wear. Elegant yet with a nod to a past title. Hmmm?

Here’s the link to the list of Newbery past winners: http://www.ala.org/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia/newberymedal/newberywinners/medalwinners

The list of Caldecott winners and honor books is: http://www.ala.org/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia/caldecottmedal/caldecotthonors/caldecottmedal